Archive | December, 2010

Cool Living: Dark Interior Homes

31 Dec

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Cool Living: Dark Interior Homes

31 Dec

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Last Flight Of Harrier Jets

30 Dec

Flying in a spectacular diamond formation so tight it ­appears they are ­almost ­touching, 16 of Britain’s legendary jump jets soar through the wintry skies.

The occasion was billed as a celebration but, for many, the mood was as sombre as the gloomy weather.

On a freezing day heavy with ­emotion, the ­Harrier — the ­revolutionary aircraft that helped Britain defeat Argentina in the Falklands War in 1982 — took to the air for the last time.


Final salute: The 16-strong fleet of distinctive Harrier jump jets keep close formation in the skies above RAF Cottesmore today


Cutting edge: A Harrier takes off from the aircraft carrier Ark Royal. Both have become victims of Government defence cuts


Celebrations of Harrier ‘VSTOL’ (Vertical Short Take off and landing) Day at RAF Cottesmore

The sense of loss — of both the iconic fighter planes, and of a cherished piece of British military and aviation history — was symbolised in a moving tradition called the ‘walk of honour’. After landing the jets following their last flight, the pilots walked away from their craft without a single backward glance.

The Harrier jets have been axed after falling victim to a savage round of defence cuts. Their next stop, after being decommissioned next year, will be the scrapyard.

To mark their retirement after 41 years’ ­service, 16 Harriers were scheduled to take off from their base at RAF Cottesmore, Rutland, and perform a spectacular flypast of seven other RAF bases, the nearby towns of Stamford and Oakham, as well as Lincoln Cathedral.

Unfortunately, the weather spoiled the occasion. Conditions were so poor that the pilots, after forming a ­diamond formation, could not safely fly below the cloud cover.

Nevertheless, more than 2,000 people turned out at the airfield to bid farewell, while the Red Arrows performed a flypast in tribute.

Air Vice-Marshal Greg Bagwell, the Air Officer Commanding No. 1 Group, said: ‘The Harrier is a true icon and stands testament to the innovation and excellence of British design and engineering and the skill and courage of our airmen.


The last hurrah: Harriers take off from RAF Cottesmore for a series of nostalgic fly-pasts before being decommissioned


An RAF Harrier puts on a display at RAF Cottesmore, after a flypast passing over seven military bases, the town centres of Stamford and Oakham and Lincoln Cathedral before landing back at RAF Cottesmore


End of an era: Flypast to mark the retirement of the Harrier aircraft above RAF Cottesmore, Oakham


What they do best: Two Harriers hover just 40 feet off the ground at RAF Cottesmore yesterday


The last-ever sortie: Harrier pilots before last flight walk to their aircraft at RAF Cottesmore


So proud: Wing Commander Simon Jessett waves from the Harrier cockpit after the last flight


Don’t look back: The pilots stride away from their aircraft as pipe band plays a stirring tune

Last Flight Of Harrier Jets

30 Dec

Flying in a spectacular diamond formation so tight it ­appears they are ­almost ­touching, 16 of Britain’s legendary jump jets soar through the wintry skies.

The occasion was billed as a celebration but, for many, the mood was as sombre as the gloomy weather.

On a freezing day heavy with ­emotion, the ­Harrier — the ­revolutionary aircraft that helped Britain defeat Argentina in the Falklands War in 1982 — took to the air for the last time.


Final salute: The 16-strong fleet of distinctive Harrier jump jets keep close formation in the skies above RAF Cottesmore today


Cutting edge: A Harrier takes off from the aircraft carrier Ark Royal. Both have become victims of Government defence cuts


Celebrations of Harrier ‘VSTOL’ (Vertical Short Take off and landing) Day at RAF Cottesmore

The sense of loss — of both the iconic fighter planes, and of a cherished piece of British military and aviation history — was symbolised in a moving tradition called the ‘walk of honour’. After landing the jets following their last flight, the pilots walked away from their craft without a single backward glance.

The Harrier jets have been axed after falling victim to a savage round of defence cuts. Their next stop, after being decommissioned next year, will be the scrapyard.

To mark their retirement after 41 years’ ­service, 16 Harriers were scheduled to take off from their base at RAF Cottesmore, Rutland, and perform a spectacular flypast of seven other RAF bases, the nearby towns of Stamford and Oakham, as well as Lincoln Cathedral.

Unfortunately, the weather spoiled the occasion. Conditions were so poor that the pilots, after forming a ­diamond formation, could not safely fly below the cloud cover.

Nevertheless, more than 2,000 people turned out at the airfield to bid farewell, while the Red Arrows performed a flypast in tribute.

Air Vice-Marshal Greg Bagwell, the Air Officer Commanding No. 1 Group, said: ‘The Harrier is a true icon and stands testament to the innovation and excellence of British design and engineering and the skill and courage of our airmen.


The last hurrah: Harriers take off from RAF Cottesmore for a series of nostalgic fly-pasts before being decommissioned


An RAF Harrier puts on a display at RAF Cottesmore, after a flypast passing over seven military bases, the town centres of Stamford and Oakham and Lincoln Cathedral before landing back at RAF Cottesmore


End of an era: Flypast to mark the retirement of the Harrier aircraft above RAF Cottesmore, Oakham


What they do best: Two Harriers hover just 40 feet off the ground at RAF Cottesmore yesterday


The last-ever sortie: Harrier pilots before last flight walk to their aircraft at RAF Cottesmore


So proud: Wing Commander Simon Jessett waves from the Harrier cockpit after the last flight


Don’t look back: The pilots stride away from their aircraft as pipe band plays a stirring tune

Yoga

30 Dec

Funmails

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Yoga

30 Dec

Funmails

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The Kings Of Africa

27 Dec

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa

The Kings Of Africa